Next Year’s Theme

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Some years our themes are easy to embrace, for example Joy or Healing or Balance (a bit more challenging). I have to admit that Change was a pretty challenging theme. But often we find more in the more challenging themes, just as we often learn our greatest lessons from the challenges we face. Next year’s theme is going to be Stillness, Waiting, Holding, … as an image: Ice.

We are going to be exploring finding what we learn from Silence, what is under the surface, the benefits of slowing down, the drawing power of emptiness, and what we gain in waiting. When the molecules of water slow down, water becomes ice, and we can see it’s inner structure. Dr. Emoto’s images of water that had been charged with different energies made it possible for everyone to see how those energies were locked into the water, even when most people don’t have the ability to feel it when the water is in liquid form. Film has made it possible for us to slow things down and see what we couldn’t when something is moving faster than we see. Perhaps this is what meditation does for us as well.

When we scry in a crystal or in water, we look deep into the material that light usually passes through; looking deeper puts us in the right state to perceive more deeply. When the sun shines on the surface of water, who knows what’s going on below the surface? We can see what’s under the surface when the water is still, but not when the surface is rough.

Let us explore contradictions: how the same ice that makes it impossible for us to travel the river in our boats, makes it possible for us to cross it on foot or skates. How the frost that blights the blossom, preserves food so it can be eaten later. Let us learn what we hear in Silence, what we learn from saving things for later. Let us hold space for others and for ourselves, and find the crystal form of our centers.

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Dark Time of the Year

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Here we are in the quiet time of the year. In the Middle Ages, we’d be in the roisterous 12 Days of Christmas, and coming out of the long month of Advent fasting; these days we are exhausted by the holiday partying that has been going on all December and ready to “nest” in a quiet week after Christmas and before New Years. This gives us an opportunity to think back over the past year, and forward to the coming year.

We all speak of the “veil thinning” at Samhain (and Beltain), but it isn’t just one dangerous night, it’s like the ebb and flow of the tide, coming in and going out, the season of spirits crossing over more easily begins (for some) the Full moon before Samhain and continues until after Yule. That’s quite a “high tide” of spiritual activity. In the dark of winter, it was dangerous to go out because you might fall victim to the Wild Hunt. Even safe at home you had better remember to make offerings to your house spirits, those creatures who help you every year.

The traditional story is of a housewife who buried the lump of butter in the porridge one Christmas Eve so that when he came to get it, the Nisse thought she’d neglected to add it. In annoyance, he killed the family cow. Then he went back and ate the porridge, discovering the hidden butter. It was now too late to save the cow, so he magickally switched a neighbor’s cow for their dead one. In the morning, the farmer went out to milk and discovered his neighbor’s cow in his barn. Returning it to his neighbor, they found the exchange that had been made, and eventually figured out it was because of the error of the wife. So make sure you let your house or barn wight know that they are appreciated! “

The light is returning, but we have yet to reach the latest sunrise of the year (that happens around two weeks after Solstice, whereas the earliest sunset happens about two weeks before Solstice, making Solstice the shortest DAY of the year.) This is a great time of year to pause and reflect and try to be in touch with the spirits of many sorts while the veil is still thin.

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Cromniomancy

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Cromniomancy – In some parts of the world, the first day of December is the traditional time for young girls to perform the ancient art of cromniomancy (divination by onion sprouts) to find out the name of their future husband.
To find out who your future husband will be, take some onions and upon each one carve or write a different man’s name. Place the onions near a fire and the man whose name is on the onion that sprouts first will be the one.

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Happy Crystal Skull World Day

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Crystal Skull World Day is held the Sunday of 4th week of November.

When I was a kid I loved the stories about “the Crystal Skull”, a unique artifact with unknown mystical properties. As I got bigger I discovered there were more than one. These days crystal skulls are available in many shops, and yet they still are said to have amazing occult properties.

According to the Crystal Skull World Day website “Crystal Skull World Day is an event created by a group of dedicated guardians in order bring together people who share the same profound passion for crystal skulls. All the members are volunteers and have given their time and effort to put together this fantastic event.”

The reproduction skulls are said to be healing, and are popular among New Age and other enthusiasts. After all, like so many other energetic affects, how one will interact with someone’s energetic field depends on the person and the skull. Different materials like amethyst or jade, also result in different properties, although carved stone skulls are still referred to as ‘crystal’ as a group.

We perhaps don’t even need to mention how popular skulls are in the rest of the world, whether from the last Indiana Jone movie, or as jewelry, Halloween and Day of the Dead decor, or just weird stuff like using it as a Vodka bottle or cups.

Fun is fun, but CTCW attendees are generally more interested in what we can do with the ones we can use to improve our lives.

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Aura Awareness Day

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It’s not just us. The world knows that there’s an energetic part of reality. International Aura Awareness Day was established in 2002 to create awareness of this. Aura Day takes place the fourth Saturday in November.

There’s a reasonable agreement on what an aura is, although there’s a huge range of theories about how it works, and what knowing about it can do. Early Spiritualists, Swedenborgians, and others mentioned the “subtle emanation around living beings”, medieval Christians as well as Hindus and Buddhists represent holy people surrounded by light, which indicates that some people have always been able to perceive auras. In Greek, the word aura means breeze or upper air, in Latin or breeze or breath.
Some people can see auras, others can’t. I know I don’t, but we used to annoy my sister because her aura was palpable by almost everyone, and we would play with it.

We think of auras as surrounding people, but all living things have energy fields: plants, animals, and perhaps other things we would consider inanimate. Certainly no one doubts that a magnet is surrounded by an energy field. But auras aren’t magnetic, they’re something else, and this field responds to physical, psychological and spiritual changes. Some humans can see them, some cameras and other devices can record them. They can be used to diagnose and sometimes affect moods and illnesses. Some say fixing holes in your aura can keep energy from leaking out. Similarly, some emotions can taint your aura, causing physical illness, which clears up when the aura is energetically cleansed.
As energy within the body is said to run through meridians, it is also said to radiate out from the body in layers, sometimes described as etheric, emotional, mental, astral, celestial, spiritual, and other terms used to explain how that layer interacts with different parts of the aura. Each layer seems to serve a different function. Some are tight to our body- and may be the energetic component of the physical body, while other parts can extend yards out from us. These fields also change in size and shape (and color).

Those who read auras say that certain colors can tell us what’s going on in our energy field. With the advent of aura technology, we can all get a peek at what our auras are doing- before and after meditation comparisons are fun.

Red – fearless and passionate
Pink – Deeply sensitive and gentle in nature
Orange – creative and full of emotion
Yellow – Confident and happy with high self-esteem
Tan – Practical and detail-oriented
Green – Natural born self-healers who are drawn to nature and animals
Blue – Caring, nurturing, and protective
Purple – Charismatic with a powerful personality
White – Spiritually motivated, positive, and uplifting (These descriptions are from the National Day Calendar holiday description.)

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